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  • Need a haircut?
  • Ellen Lewis
  • First Fridaymusings
Need a haircut?

So much fun stuff is coming up, I don't know where to start.  It seems like we jumped right into warm weather this week and our collective mood shifted to summer mode.  We're kicking things off with a great First Friday project for June, a simply shaped top modeled after so many I've admired from classic designer Eileen Fisher.  

Later next month, Mary will be kicking off our summer shawl Mystery Knitalong in beautiful Pima Kuri from Mirasol.  Also this summer I'm introducing a fun new class format called Knit One, Sip Too.  These are evening classes with wine - perfect for a girls' night out.  And finally, I'm  excited to announce that Jenny May is back on the Crazy for Ewe team with fun sock classes and knitalongs.  She'll also be stepping up the shop's presence on Ravelry, giving you another way to be part of the Crazy for Ewe community.  Remember that you can comment on the blog or the newsletter, and you can follow us on Facebook, Pinterest, Instagram, or Twitter.  Most importantly though, you are always welcome to come into the shop and sit around the table to knit or just to visit.

The importance and value of our time around the table struck me the other day when I saw this TED talk by Dr. Joseph Ravenell about a Harlem barbershop.  The men go there about every other week for a trim, and lots of them stop in more frequently just to hang out and visit.  They've been coming to this shop for years and years, and it's more than just a place for a hair cut. It's a place where they talk about things - sports, life, health.  It's a safe space, and the men share more information about their health with their barber than they do a doctor.  Dr. Ravenell explains, "The barbershop is  a place of connection, loyalty, and trust"  where men are comfortable talking about difficult topics, like high blood pressure, a leading killer among his demographic.  Recognizing this phenomenon, Ravenell has helped this and other barbershops offer free blood pressure screening and has probably saved the lives of many men.  It all started by recognizing where the men gathered and shared their lives.  Ravenell ends by asking, "What is your barbershop?"   

My barbershop is around the table at the shop.  It too is place of connection, loyalty, and trust.  It is a safe space where we talk about our lives, our health, our families, our jobs, our relationships --the experiences women experience throughout their lifetime.  There is a wide range of ages around the table, and we can share the changes we experience in our bodies and in our lives.  So many conversations start with, "So, this thing happenend..."  or "Is it weird that I've been feeling....,"  and to hear from the mothers, daughters, sisters, and friends who've gone before say, "No, that's perfectly normal," or maybe, "You might want to have that looked at."  

In this disconnected world where we share more personal data than we should in social media, but find that we cannot or do not take the time for actual conversations in real life, it's nice to know that there is a place where can come and be part of the sisterhood of women like you who care for each other and about each other.  I look forward to seeing you in the shop and around the table.  You are always welcome here.   ~Ellen

  • Ellen Lewis
  • First Fridaymusings

Comments on this post ( 2 )

  • Jun 01, 2016

    I so gree with your words. My best times were at my art or knitting classes. Technology is wonderful for many things but not all. This generation needs to learn more social skills not just looking at a screen. Since I’m not a local person to share in your sessions I so enjoy reading what u feel. Thanks again for your emails & your patience with my requests & orders ellen

    — Sandy seith

  • May 31, 2016

    The beauty and importance of a sense of connection is so beautifully stated in your blog, Ellen. Amen to the celebration of actual face-to-face conversation and the sharing of emotions that is more meaningful than the posting of emoticons.
    It’s hard to be glued to our electronic devices when we are knitting!

    — Susan

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