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Crazy for Ewe

Creativity is just play

Creativity is just play
I just finished reading The Starless Sea, by Erin Morgenstern. It was a little crazy, and a little confusing, but rich and full with lush romantic imagery. I thoroughly enjoyed it. Some stories began and ended. Others cropped up out of nowhere. Characters and themes moved between the stories, all tied together with bees and crowns and keys and owls.  As I said, a little confusing, so I creeped on the author and came across a review of the book by someone from Harvard.  Certainly, they know their stuff at Harvard, right? What did he think? Well... he hated it. No plot line, no character development, no dramatic tension, and so on. He cited an offending piece of prose, appalled that editors had not  Continue reading

Just 10 minutes

Just 10 minutes
You have probably heard of The Whole Life Challenge. I may be only person on the planet who had not heard of this 6-week program that addresses nutrition, exercise, reflection and so on.  My son's company is big into fitness and well -being, and Rick, one of the owners, invited everyone in the company to participate at company expense.  Johnny continue Continue reading

Every day is a new beginning

Every day is a new beginning
Happy New Year!  This first full week of 2020 is looking pretty good! Inventory done and everything ship shape and organized.  Even the shop's been rearranged for the new year.  It looks good‑I think you'll like it.  While I hate doing inventory, I'm always glad to have done inventory.  In fact, I'm tempted to do it more often just to get this feeling!  It makes me think about a conversation I had with my wonderful  Continue reading

The in-process mess

The in-process mess

I spent much of last week getting the house ready for the holidays.  I’m not an over-the-top type when it comes to Christmas decorating, but a friend asked if we would be on the Health Share Holiday House Tour this year, and it’s such a worthy cause that I couldn’t say no. But when people pay actual money to see them, your decorations have to be extra.  

So, I enlisted several trusted friends to help me hose down the mantles with greenery and hang a power of garland and ribbons and wreaths - oh my. 

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Rainy days and Mondays

Rainy days and Mondays

Every have one of those days? My yesterday was. Gray and rainy is my least favorite kind of weather, unless I can curl up on the sofa with a cup of tea and my knitting, but I couldn't because there were a million and three things to do.  Plus my daughter, Elizabeth, was getting ready to go back to Seattle.  While she'll be back at Christmas, the transition is still always hard.  I wish I could tell you that when I feel this way, I give myself a spoonful of sugar, fly my magic umbrella to a Mary Poppins kind of place. But I'm not, and I don't.  I just sort of trudge through and

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Mode at Rowan--even better in real life

Mode at Rowan--even better in real life
Sometimes you just don't know how a thing is going to be until you see it. When the Mode at Rowan book came out, I was all about this blue cardigan.  Maybe it's just I am so entranced by the model, but honestly, I thought this was going to be the standout piece of the show.  It wasn't.  Looks great on her, as  Continue reading

What makes you a real knitter?

What makes you a real knitter?
As I was scrolling through social media this weekend, a sponsored link popped up from Masterclass. Most ads annoy me, but there is something very compelling about these online classes. Maybe it's the rockstar artist types they have doing them - I mean, legit famous people ‑ world renowned experts in their field ‑teaching subjects not in the catalog of the most prestigious universities. Annie Lebovitz, Itzhak Perlman and Wolfgang Puck speak with such candor‑as if they are a close friend, right in the room with you sharing their authentic experience, helping you to explore and learn. It is honestly mesmerizing. One particular promo featured the novelist  Continue reading

Knitting and modern domesticity

Knitting and modern domesticity

I recently listened to a podcast in which Trish Malcolm interviewed Cecelia Campochiaro, author of Sequence Knitting. Trish Malcolm often begins her interviews by asking her guest how they got into knitting. Campochiaro said that it was not her mother, but the mother of a friend who taught her to knit. Apparently Campochiaro's mother had been forced to major in home economics in college and bore deep resentment against domestic arts. 

I can totally see that. Even activities we genuinely enjoy lose all their charm

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Get outside your comfort zone

Get outside your comfort zone

My son, Colton, likes a girl at school. He'd like to ask her out for coffee or something but he is terrified.

"This is so hard," he moans.

"What's so hard?" I wonder, "Pick up the phone and call, I mean text and see if she'd like to get coffee." These are simple words, simple concepts.

Silence.

"Did you text her?"

"No."Gt

"Are you going to?"

"Maybe. I dunno. Probably not"

"Why not?"

"What if she says no?"

Aaah, the crux of the matter.  It's not hard to ask, but the fear of failure is something else entirely‑especially when you're 17.

Not that it gets any easier at 27, or 57.  I guess by the time we're 97 we would be over it, but who knows.  

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